We've got some BIG readers working at Superior Public Library! Are you looking for something great to read? Check out our latest Staff Picks and find your next favorite book! If you'd like to request any of the books listed below, click the title and you can request it directly from our library catalog!

 

 

The Ultimate Meal-Prep Cookbook: One Grocery List. A Week of Meals. No Waste by America’s Test Kitchen (Adult Non-Fiction)

Meal prep no longer means filling your freezer with boring casseroles, dipping into the same pot of beans every day for a week, or spending all day Sunday cooking. Instead, use these smart meal plans to customize fast, fresh dinners that fit your ever-changing schedule. This book has 25 weekly plans that minimize shopping and kitchen time and guide you through prep-ahead options, make-ahead options, and ingredient substitutions. Reap the benefits to make your life easier, your grocery bill lower, and your dinners better.

 

 

 

 

The Prophets by Robert Jones Jr. (Adult Fiction)

Isaiah was Samuel's and Samuel was Isaiah's. That was the way it was since the beginning, and the way it was to be until the end. In the barn they tended to the animals, but also to each other, transforming the hollowed-out shed into a place of human refuge, a source of intimacy and hope in a world ruled by vicious masters. But when an older man--a fellow slave--seeks to gain favor by preaching the master's gospel on the plantation, the enslaved begin to turn on their own. Isaiah and Samuel's love, which was once so simple, is seen as sinful and a clear danger to the plantation's harmony.

 

 

 

 

No One is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood (Adult Fiction)

This book that asks: Is there life after the internet? As this urgent, genre-defying book opens, a woman who has recently been elevated to prominence for her social media posts travels around the world to meet her adoring fans. She is overwhelmed by navigating the new language and etiquette of what she terms "the portal," where she grapples with an unshakable conviction that a vast chorus of voices is now dictating her thoughts. When existential threats--from climate change and economic precariousness to the rise of an unnamed dictator and an epidemic of loneliness--begin to loom, she posts her way deeper into the portal's void. Suddenly, two texts from her mother pierce the fray: "Something has gone wrong," and "How soon can you get here?" As real life and its stakes collide with the increasingly absurd antics of the portal, the woman confronts a world that seems to contain both an abundance of proof that there is goodness, empathy, and justice in the universe, and a deluge of evidence to the contrary.

 

 

 

Masterpiece: America's 50-Year-Old Love Affair with British Television Drama by Nancy West (Non-Fiction)

Since its PBS debut on a wintry night fifty years ago, Masterpiece Theatre has captivated American audiences with British drama, introducing us to characters like Downton Abbey’s Dowager Countess and the hunky Ross Poldark. Our appetite for British drama has never been bigger, and this book is a look at the fascinating history behind this program. What accounts for Masterpiece Theatre's longevity and influence? This book offers two reasons: the power of its drama and its aspirational appeal. Masterpiece delivers great stories, stories that transport, enthrall, enrich, and comfort us. But it also speaks to a uniquely American belief in the possibility of self-improvement, even self-transformation, through the acquisition of "culture."

 

 

 

 

Thru-Hike the Superior Hiking Trail by Annie Nelson (Adult Non-Fiction)

This novel is constructed around two actual horrific events in the 1940s-- the Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire in Boston and a train derailment in North Carolina. It’s 2017 now and Lil and Frank, in their late eighties, have been married for over 60 years. Each lost a parent in one of these tragedies, wounds that altered their lives. The story weaves among time periods and points of view as Lil and Frank sift through their troubled memories. Moving and reflective.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blood Grove by Walter Mosley (Adult Fiction)

#15 in the Easy Rawlins mystery series. After being approached by a shell-shocked Vietnam War veteran who claims to have gotten into a fight protecting a white woman from a black man, Easy embarks on an investigation that takes him from mountaintops to the desert, through South Central and into sex clubs and the homes of the fabulously wealthy, facing hippies, the mob, and old friends perhaps more dangerous than anyone else.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Murder on Bank Street: A Gaslight Mystery by Victoria Thompson (Adult Fiction)

"#10 in the Gaslight mystery series. Malloy takes up the unsolved murder of Dr. Brandt, but the shocking revelations he uncovers may destroy Sarah-- and Malloy's hope for any future with her. After four long years will the killer be brought to justice? Readers of historical mysteries will enjoy this one!" -- Recommended by Linda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Dark Library by Cyrille Martinez; translated by Joseph Patrick Stancil (Adult Fiction)

Libraries are magical places. But what if they're even more magical than we know? In Cyrille Martinez's library, the books are alive: not just their ideas or their stories, but the books themselves. Meet the Angry Young Book, who has strong opinions about who reads what and why. He's tired of people reading bestsellers, so he places himself on the desks of those who might appreciate him. Meet the Old Historian who mysteriously vanished from the stacks. Meet the Blue Librarian, the Mauve Librarian, the Yellow Librarian, and spend a day with the Red Librarian trying to banish coffee cups and laptops. Then one day there are no empty desks anywhere in the Great Library. A great horde of student workers has descended, and they will scan every single book in the library: the much-borrowed, the neglected, the popular, the obscure. What will happen to the library then? Will it still be necessary? The Dark Library is a theoretical fiction, a meditation on what libraries mean in our digital world. Has the act of reading changed? What is a reader? A book? Martinez, a librarian himself, has written a love letter to the urban forest of the dark, wild library, where ideas and stories roam free.

 

 

 

The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins (Adult Fiction)

A delicious twist on a Gothic classic! Meet Jane. Newly arrived to Birmingham, Alabama, Jane is a broke dog-walker in Thornfield Estates--a gated community full of McMansions, shiny SUVs, and bored housewives. Her luck changes when she meets recent widower Eddie Rochester, Thornfield Estates' most mysterious resident. His wife, Bea, drowned in a boating accident with her best friend, their bodies lost to the deep. As Jane and Eddie fall for each other, Jane is increasingly haunted by the legend of Bea, an ambitious beauty with a rags-to-riches origin story, who launched a wildly successful southern lifestyle brand. How can she, plain Jane, ever measure up? And can she win Eddie's heart before her past--or his--catches up to her? With delicious suspense, incisive wit, and a fresh, feminist sensibility, The Wife Upstairs flips the script on a timeless tale of forbidden romance, ill-advised attraction, and a wife who just won't stay buried. In this vivid reimagining of one of literature's most twisted love triangles, which Mrs. Rochester will get her happy ending?

 

 

 

 

In the Night of Memory by Linda LeGarde Grover (Adult Fiction)

When Loretta surrenders her young girls to the county and then disappears, she becomes one more missing Native woman in Indian Country's long devastating history of loss. But she is also a daughter of the Mozhay Point Reservation in northern Minnesota and the mother of Azure and Rain, ages 3 and 4, and her absence haunts all the lives she has touched--and all the stories they tell in this novel. After a string of foster placements, from cold to kind to cruel, the girls find their way back to their extended Mozhay family, and a new set of challenges, and stories, unfolds. Deftly, Grover conjures a chorus of women's voices (sensible, sensitive Azure's first among them) to fill in the sorrows and joys, the loves and the losses that have brought the girls and their people to this moment. In the Night of Memory creates a nuanced, moving, often humorous picture of two Ojibwe girls becoming women in light of this lesson learned in the long, sharply etched shadow of Native American history. -- Recommended by Leslie

 

 

 

 

Lovecraft Country, Season One (DVD)

Based on Matt Ruff's novel, this series follows Korean war vet Atticus Freeman, his friend Letitia and his Uncle George on a journey across 1950s Jim Crow America where they face racist terrors and the terrifying monsters of an H.P. Lovecraft paperback.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One By One by Ruth Ware (Adult Fiction)

Getting snowed in at a luxurious, rustic ski chalet high in the French Alps doesn't sound like the worst problem in the world. Especially when there's a breathtaking vista, a full-service chef and housekeeper, a cozy fire to keep you warm, and others to keep you company. When the cofounder a trendy London-based tech startup, organizes a week long trip for the team in the French Alps, it starts out as a corporate retreat like any other: PowerPoint presentations and strategy sessions broken up by mandatory bonding on the slopes. But as soon as one shareholder upends the agenda by pushing a lucrative but contentious buyout offer, tensions simmer and loyalties are tested. The storm brewing inside the chalet is no match for the one outside, however, and a devastating avalanche leaves the group cut off from all access to the outside world. As each hour passes without any sign of rescue, panic mounts, the chalet grows colder, and the group dwindles further . . . one by one. --- Recommended by Judy